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Intangible feelings

After eighth grade, junior Catherine Trinh has undergone trials of difficulties that helped her blossom into a girl who possesses more tolerance for those around her.  

Losing her childhood best friend has made Trinh go through hardships, like building new relationships.

“I used to be so open to people to get to know others and their personalities, but right now I haven’t been as open as I was in the past,” Trinh said. “It’s better that way because if you are open to people, you never know if they are going to spread rumors about you.”

Trinh now knows her limits to trust others after being overly open to her friends and experiencing betrayal.

“If you are open to people, you never know if they are going to spread rumors about you and you will face a phase of depression,” Trinh said. “Throughout the relationship I’ve been in, I got cheated on, but I learned to take time on them and just get to know that person before giving your heart to them.”

From her phase of depression, Trinh found several methods to pave way from her extreme sadness. One major factor would be the support of her family.

“My family [helped me with my depression] because they’re everything to me,” Trinh said. “I don’t put anyone before my family. They tried to talk to some people about the situation that I was involved in. I [have also been] writing out my feelings throughout sophomore year.“

After that difficult obstacle, Trinh looks forward to her future and has ideas of what her life of what it would be like many years from now. Wishing to “learn more about other cultures and new things in life” by traveling, Trinh foresees herself getting into a good college, studying law, and possibly becoming a photographer.  

 

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