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Musical Review: Addams Family wows crowd

The ghosts (from left to right), played by Justin Cheung, Annie Nguyen, Anthony Ngo, Kabrina Bennett, Lily Cabrera, Alfredo Esquivel, Ryan Tran, and Genesis Landeros, dance side-by-side with Gomez, played by Marco Cardenas, and Morticia, played by Sam Clark, in their dance number, “Tango de Amor.”
Photo by Kelly Lac

With little knowledge about The Addams Family other than their bizarre family appearance and influence in pop culture, I was in for a ride when I went to see the musical on opening night. Needless to say, I was blown away.

The Addams Family (musical), written by Andrew Lippa, Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, is a musical comedy that tells the tale of a rowdy night in the Addams household, which includes the announcement of Wednesday’s (played by senior Brianna Cabrera) relationship with her boyfriend, Lucas Beineke (freshman Jakob Pabon); a secret that Gomez (sophomore Marco Cardenas) is scared of hiding from his wife, Morticia (senior Sam Clark); and Pugsley’s (sophomore Vicky Vo) wicked plan that turns for the worse.

Throughout the musical, you get to know a little bit about each family member, which helped those, including me, that do not know much about the Addams. While they may not look and act like the traditional American family, their views about love and honesty are practically standard, something everyone can understand.

The cast depicted the Addams family very accurately appearance-wise, and the set design was very impressive for a high school production. Not only was their acting spot on, but the musical numbers were very entertaining and exciting. There were some jokes that passed by that I did not understand, but the adults did. Overall, though, it was very humorous, especially when the jokes were unexpected.

However, what caught my eye the most throughout the play was at the denouement: Gomez began to plan for a trip to Paris as a makeup gift for Morticia after lying to her, followed by his solo number, “Not Today.” I was very impressed with Cardenas’ vocals because of how loud he was, sometimes even overpowering his own microphone. Because of his confidence and poise, it felt as if Gomez was really there on stage, even if I knew that Cardenas was just acting.

Additionally, the dance number following his solo was Tango de Amor, in which both Gomez and Morticia embrace for a tango. I was amazed at how well choreographed this number was because of how complex the dance was, especially when Cardenas managed to carry Clark several times with ease. They probably spent a lot of time trying to perfect this number, to which I commend them for their hard work and execution.

As the musical drew to a close, both the Addams family and the Beineke family became closer and accepted each other’s differences, bringing a heartwarming ending. The Addams Family was definitely worth watching, and being the first musical held in the San Gabriel High School auditorium in 15 years, it was refreshing to see something new, and I hope the drama department will continue to bring something new every year.

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